About your Search

20120801
20120831
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
: where was the rover built? >> it was built here at jpl. we had lots of partners all over the world too, where the science missions have been donated by foreign countries. >> bill: did you do -- the launch -- or the landing, was so perfect. did you do any practice runs like -- i'm just curious, like in the desert or anything? >> there has been an extensive testing of everything on here instruments, landing. you name it we have tested it. i don't know if they did a full end-to-end testing. i would have to ask one of the landing engineers. >> bill: but certainly all of the instruments and cameras, was all tested. >> yes, we have continuing to test even today. we're doing extensive testing on the drilling and arm, and we'll continue to test all through the mission. >> bill: let me ask you what have we learned so far? >> we have learned that we have landed in a very exciting place. this mission is not -- unlike anything else we have ever flown. it's very, very complex. it has more instruments more things to do than anything we have put down on the surface of the planet. we
, integrated chief from jpl. doug ellison, visualization producer at jpl. we will begin with michael watkins. >> good morning. another fantastic day on mars -- curiosity continues to be paved basically flawlessly. we executed all the planned activities successfully yesterday. it is a good time for me to point out that the team operating curiosity is also performing flawlessly. completing all planned activities as well. it is really just a great day all around. the activities consist of a couple of things. we are about to do -- upgrade our software on the rover. just like we upgrade our operating system on your home computer or a laptop or something -- we will do the same thing. we will have a new flight software that is optimized for service. we landed with one optimized for landing. that does not have to operate the arm and all that. the surface is not have to land the vehicle. we want to switch to this new software that is optimized for service operations. we will do that starting tomorrow. -- the day after tomorrow, sorry. we'll start that activity. we will do preparation for that activit
and also just the human perspective. how many people worked on this to make this happen? >> jpl alone, we had about 3,500 people. >> amazing.
this happen? >> jpl alone, we had about 3,500 people. >> amazing. >> that doesn't include all the other centers and contractors and everything else. i believe i heard a number 7,000 people worked on this project. >> thanks so much. be sure to watch the very last word on the website. you can follow me on twitter at chrislhayes. "ed show" is up next. that everybody is talking about has mitt romney whining. republicans are on defense and ann coulter is calling for the head of romney's spokesperson? gosh, it's getting interesting. all that and harry reid is starting to reveal more information about his source. i'm loving it. hope you are too. this is "the ed show," let's get to work. >>> the past when people pointed out that something was inaccurate, why campaigns pulled the ad, they were embarrassed. >> the debate over the joe soptic ad hits fever pitch. mitt romney is crying foul in a stunning display of hypocrisy. >> they just blast ahead. journalist michael kinsley says the ad is fair game and he joins us tonight. >>> newt gingrich admits romney's welfare commercial is full of holes. >>
to be there sunday night at jpl lab, in the control room. >> no way. >> watching the thing. it's really cool, you know whatever the satellite or whatever it is that's taking it up there, near mars and there is a parachute. >> a rocketship. >> okay. the parachute opens and the rover comes down and then there is a crane actually that will lower it and put it right on the surface. >> they are doing this from however far mars is away from here? millions of miles? >> unbelievable. >> will we be able to watch any of that, i wonder. >> we have the olympics. we can at least have this. >> this might be the only thing that could pull me away from the olympics. i might actually watch this. >> they are going to tape delay it if it's on nbc. >> that's true. >> why don't you find out and let us know before the end of the program. i think it's very exciting. again, citizens united. health care here at the top of the hour and jobs in the next hour. but first: >> this is the full"the full court press". >> other headlines making news two major gold medal wins for the u.s. in lonton
to do it at jpl. >> exciting stuff. >> i know you will write about this. >> one last thing, tony. >> tucker says it will clear up this weekend. we can see mars in the western sky. i will have a chart this weekend so people can go out and look and see mars, wave hello at curiosity and check out the meteor shower on saturday night, the per see equaled. >> that's right. >> thanks. good to have you. >> thanks, greg, tony. >>> time is 8:38. monday morning. still ahead, football preseason is underway. we will show you highlights from the hall of fame game. e. i'm drinking dunkin'. i'm drinking dunkin' iced mocha. they make it exactly how i like it. medium, iced, with a turbo shot. french vanilla, hazelnut, caramel -- i love 'em all. they make it perfect every time. america runs on dunkin' coffee. that's mom to you. and you should eat something that's good for you before you go outside. never! come on james. it's a new fiber one chewy bar. chocolatey and delicious. fiber one chewy bar, huh? mmm. refueled space captain james. [ male announcer ] new fiber one chewy bars. great taste kids
laboratory or jpl. you are steely-eyed missile men and you deserve every missed high five of your celebration. i got to say, it was nice to see that nasa saved money by hiring staff from the local best buy. but, folks -- it's a penny pincher, a penny pincher. and, folks, just cry to conceive of what was achieved this morning. we gently landed a one ton, six-wheel suv 154 million miles from earth. i mean, that onstar lady is getting good. we now have two rovers on the surface of mars and three satellites orbiting it. basically if the planets are a tray of donuts, we have now licked mars. it's ours. we already had the moon, we just need venus for the monopoly and we can start building hotels on them. >> welcome back to "morning joe." sam stein and katty kay are still with us, along with john meacham in new york. joining us here in washington, the host of "hardball" chris matthews. and author of "jack kennedy." >> chris, you came on set and said you like what harry reid did. >> how could you like that? >> i liked it because i think obama has needed confederates in the field for most of his life
jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter . guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be useful for explo
the olympics. it sounded like last night at the jpl, at the jet prop pulse lab who are the ones responsible for the mars rover working for nasa. their laboratory in pasadena california. here was the big word. >> wooo! wooo >> they are wound pretty tight. >> they have been working. imagine how many years they have been working on this thing. >> sure, yeah. >> how much money they spent. originally, they put one.$6,000,000,000 toward this project and it ended up costing two and a half billion dollars. >> my tax dollars well spent. >> uh-huh. >> just amazing. what was it? like 14 minutes or so because there wasn't any direct line with earth at the time that it landed. so it took 14 minutes for it to kind of turn the corner and make that what? 154 million miles. so it took that long. there was a period where they thought it was down but they didn't know for like 14 minutes, i guess. they had to wait and wait and wait and wait and then boom. >> that's when that news came. very exciting. >> it's awesome. i love -- i love the space program stuff. >> yeah. >> and the
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)